Posts Tagged ‘genre’

“Sloppy is a beautiful reader of a newspaper”

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Come on, Lorentzenites, explain this post title.

In class I mentioned quickly at the end that I had found a website from the University of Toronto that is using digital technology to analyze the voice(s) of The Waste Land.  The site has clear info about its approach, and you can see how the class identified the voices, can see the results of their computer algorithm (what?! crazy idea) and can even identify and name the voice(s) yourself.  It’s interesting to poke around on, but this last feature is my true interest and I’d love to see any of you who are interested have a go at it.  If you do it, annotate your own text also so you can share with us (I’m especially curious about the “naming” aspect).  Might be fun to do with a classmate or friend also.

Concept/Vocabulary List from Keller: A Summary in Fragments

Saturday, January 26th, 2013

All of the following are quotations or ideas from Keller’s “The Twentieth-Century Long Poem.”  Feel free to add, comment, annotate, question.

“desire to reclaim for poetry the range and significance it had ceded to the novel”

“reach beyond the inward perspective of the postromantic lyric to include sociological, anthropological and […] historical material”

“collage epics”

“lyric sequences”

“poetic meditations”

“continuous verse narratives”

“cinematic montage”

“musical form”

“Indeed, the lack of restrictive generic conventions is crucial to the identity and coherence of the long poem.”

fragmentation—coherence

“poem-as-process” can “incorporate private and public statement, individual self-construction and communal identity, social criticism and nationalistic celebration, epic breadth and lyric intensity”

Juxtaposition “without connective material”

“reinterpret inherited myths”

“symbolic patterns”

multivocality

“epistolary, dramatic, and essayistic forms”

“lines developing with apparent spontaneity in response to immediate apprehension and […] extended forms with no predetermined shape”

“the hero […] is in part the poet himself and in part a mythicized aggrandizement”

“didactic intellectual exploration”

quest

“lyrics can accumulate without any fixed end”

“diary or notebooklike forms”

“meditative, apolitical uses of the long poem to record acts of the mind”

“experimental vehicles”

“revived interest in narrative”

“incorporation of found documents”

“the tendency toward change essential to the American long poem’s paradoxical tradition of innovation”

“revisionary mythmaking”

“fusing its predominantly Anglo-American traditions with forms and languages distinct to particular minority cultures”

“arbitrary structuring systems” and “nondiscursive patterns”

“a liberating mixture of genres”